What is Abstract?

Belmont

ab·stract art

noun

Art that does not attempt to represent external reality, but seeks to achieve its effect using shapes, forms, colors, and textures.

Steve Michaels goes beyond this idea and takes abstract to a whole new level through his unique photographic techniques. Using HDR and several of his own “Secret” techniques, Steve is able to come up with a whole new look to Abstract Imagery.

What exactly is Abstract Imagery?

Abstract imagery attempts to describe the vast expanse of human experience that is not limited to the physical world. This can include concepts such as “infinity” and “zero,” shared ideas such as “freedom” and “reason,” and experiences like “death” and “elation.” Despite being universal concepts, no universally recognized image or sensation exists to describe them.

NY City

Light exhibits qualities far beyond that of mere pigment on canvas.Conventional art is visible by reflected light, or light that emanates from a source other than the artwork itself. When light falls on a painting, certain wave lengths (colors) are absorbed and others are transmitted back to the eye. The image is modified by the interplay between light and reflection to create the visual experience.

No doubt, the nature of the light source can have a dramatic affect on how the art is perceived. In fact removing the painting from the equation and considering the light source to be the art has sparked Steve Michaels’ imagination.

The concept of abstract art by its very nature evades definition. It seeks to break away from traditional representation of physical objects. It explores the relationship of forms and colors, often having no source at all in an external visual reality. Yet these “Pictures of Nothing” tend to inspire curiosity and spark imagination. Abstract art can be interpreted to possess a moral dimension, in that it can be seen to stand for virtues such as order, purity, simplicity and spirituality.

“Abstraction allows me to better communicate my emotions and ideas about life. I’m really more interested in a discovery process than I am in the final composition. For me it is a journey in search of something more elusive, poetical and imaginative where I can present my own honest feelings or ideas with aim of producing a meditational response in the viewer.”

—Steve Michaels